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How To Write Amazing Blog Post Titles That People Actually Click

The titles of your blog posts are detrimental to the success of your content marketing. In a sea of Google search results and social media, the title of your post can mean the difference between a reader clicking for more or just brushing you aside.

In this post we’ll talk about 5 ways you can write catchy blog post titles that people can’t help but click on.

The titles of your blog posts are detrimental to the success of your content marketing. In a sea of Google search results and social media, the title of your post can mean the difference between a reader clicking for more or just brushing you aside. In this post we’ll talk about 5 ways you can write catchy blog post titles that people can’t help but click on.

Why Blog Titles Are So Important to Successful Content Marketing

Your blog headline is the first impression a reader will have with your content.

It can be their reason for clicking or their reason for brushing your post aside.

How sad would it be to slave over a blog post for hours, getting the content just write and then slapping a title on it that doesn’t draw people to the value they’ll find within the content?

We live in fast-paced times where the amount of information we see each day is astounding.

People are flying through their Facebook feed while waiting in checkout lines or scrolling through Pinterest while watching TV.

It’s become increasingly harder to make your content stand out and reach your ideal audience in this noisy sea of information.

But a catchy headline could cause someone to pause, pique their interest and make them hungry for more of the content they’ll find in your blog post.

It’s also one of the most important factors for your search engine optimization (SEO).

Combine SEO with a catchy, intriguing headline and it’s content marketing gold!

Let’s get into some tips for writing blog headlines that get clicked, shall we?

1: Keep your Blog Post Titles Short and Unique

55 characters is your target for the length of your blog post titles.

This is amount of characters that Google will show users in their search results. Anything longer will get cut off.

Shorter headlines also tend to get more clicks because they’re easier for readers to digest and know exactly what they’ll get when they click.

Get creative here. Don’t just write generic titles.

Include a keyword but also put some emotion into it that will make your title stand out from the rest of posts flying through the internet.

2: Focus On Keywords

Powerful headlines always focus on a keyword.

This is how people may find your blog post and let’s search engines know what your blog post is about.

Decide on what words your audience may type into Google to find your blog post and work that into the title.

3: Get Emotional

A catchy blog post title will have a healthy dose of emotion that will grab the reader’s attention and lead them to click for more.

You can use power words to not only make your post titles unique, but also give a sense of urgency, curiosity and emotion.

You want to stay away from common words like best, awesome, or great.

Go for the jugular here and get creative!

Use words like:

  • Ultimate
  • Greatest
  • Fascinating
  • The Truth About…

For example, a generic headline for blog post may go something like this:

“How to Set Boundaries in Marriage”

It’s not bad, but unless I’m really interested in that topic, it doesn’t really intrigue me much.

But what about:

“The TRUTH About Setting Boundaries in Marriage”

You see the difference? The second title creates a bit of intrigue and makes me feel like everything I’ve heard up to this point about boundaries in marriage was incorrect.

I just gotta click!!

Here’s a great list of 317 power words you can start using today.

4: Use Numbers

There’s something about numbers that increase engagement with blog post titles.

When you say “10 Ways to Set Boundaries in Marriage” as opposed to “How to Set Boundaries in Marriage” it conveys the value of the post and exactly what the reader will gain from checking out your content.

I enjoy creating these types of blog posts myself because they provide a clear outline for the content instead of a giant blank slate.

The same mentality gets passed along to readers, because they can more easily wrap their head around a list of short tips rather than one long “how to” post.

When it makes sense, try and include numbers in your headlines to drive engagement.

5: Write and Re-Write To Get Your Blog Post Titles Right

I had fun with the word-play on that subtitle, not gonna lie

Writing effective and engaging blog post titles takes a lot of practice.

Rarely will you ever use the first title you came up with.

I like to have a working title for my blog post to give me some direction for what I’m going to write.

But as the content unfolds, it may make sense to re-write the title.

Finally, once the blog post is complete, I’ll spend time focusing solely on optimizing my title.

One of my favorite tools to help me do this is CoSchedule’s Headline Analyzer.

You can put your headline into the form and CoSchedule will analyze it, score it and give you tips to improve it.

Here’s the analysis for a working title I had for this blog post:

blog post headline analyzer

You can see I’ve got some work to do get the right balance of words and structure for my title.

It will also give you some other scores to help you improve your headline, such as analyzing the length:

blog post headline analyzer length

Conclusion

Writing blog post headlines that stand out and get clicks takes time and practice.

It’s a skill, like blogging, that you’ll grow in over time.

Take note of the types of headlines you see in Google and social media and think about why they stood out to you.

Using the tips and resources above, spend time trying to recreate that feeling of urgency or curiosity you felt when you read those headlines.

Keep at it and, over time, I have no doubt you’ll see an increase in traffic to your blog posts.

Want more blogging tips? I've created a FREE checklist, 11 Things You Should Do To Every Blog Post Before You Hit Publish.

Inside, you'll get 11 simple things you can do to optimize each blog post. You can print it out and refer to whenever you write your next amazing piece of content.

I've created a free checklist for you to reference when writing your next blog post

Join the FREE “Kickstart Your Blog Traffic” Challenge

Getting people to show up to their private practice website is one of the greatest frustrations I hear from therapists.

I mean, why put all this effort into building your website if no one’s even going to visit it?

And how are you supposed to attract new clients if they can’t even find you online?

I’m with you.

I’m all for making sure you’re not spinning your wheels and wasting your time and resources trying to create a website that doesn’t bring you more traffic – and ultimately – clients.

So, how DO you increase your traffic and attract more potential clients to your website?

That’s the million dollar question, isn’t it?

Well, I’ve been there myself.

I launched Create My Therapist Website as a blog back in July of 2015 and since then I’ve learned all about what works and what doesn’t work when it comes to driving traffic to a website.

And after trying so many strategies – from pulling my hair out over SEO to trying to understand Facebook ads – I’ve landed on a simple system that keeps my blog on track and continuously brings me new traffic (mostly on autopilot).

The best part is, this traffic-driving strategy is FREE and it can work for anyone in any niche.

So, to help you get more traffic to your private practice website, I’ve developed a 10-day Kickstart Your Blog Traffic Challenge.

For 10 days, I’ll deliver one daily lesson to your inbox that will share with you simple ways you can increase traffic to your blog.

Each day will build on the day before it and by the end of it, you’ll have a system and a process you can follow to grow your traffic month after month.

I’ll also be bringing you some live video trainings along the way to answer your questions and go deeper into my favorite traffic-building tips.

Click here to enroll in the Kickstart Your Blog Traffic Challenge >>

Now, this isn’t just a bunch of random blog tips and tactics…

I’ll literally be sharing the same strategy I used that led to a 15x increase in traffic to my own website… in just 6 months.

It’s the same strategy I still use today to bring in tons of traffic to my website without SEO and paid advertising.

And I can’t wait to share it all with you inside this challenge

Because what I’ve learned is that it’s not rocket science, so anyone can follow this system to see an uptick in their own website traffic.

Ready to explode your traffic, grow your audience and attract more of your ideal clients? Join the free 10-day Kickstart Your Blog Traffic Challenge by clicking the banner below:

Click here to join

Lesson #1 will arrive in your inbox on July 10th!

Why Your Private Practice NEEDS To Be On Pinterest

Pinterest isn’t just for recipes, workout plans, and dream weddings. It’s actually a great way to drive traffic to your private practice’s website.

Did you know that Pinterest is the second largest driver of traffic, second only to Facebook?

So, if you’ve been weary about trying a new social media platform, below are 5 reasons why you need to be using Pinterest to your advantage.

Pinterest isn’t just for recipes, workout plans, and dream weddings. It’s actually a great way to drive traffic to your private practice’s website.

Reason #1: Pinterest has over 150 million users (and growing) who are providing details about their psychographics.

Whether they’re looking for inspirational quotes or have a board dedicated completely to self-care tips, your ideal clients are identifying themselves daily.

Using attractive graphics and optimizing your captions with keywords specific to your niche will draw your future clients directly to your site.

Your potential clients are using Pinterest already, so use it as an opportunity to attract them with content relevant to your private practice and expertise.

Reason #2: Your clients are open and receptive to your message.

In fact, they’re looking for it.

By being consistent with the design of your pin images and consistently providing content that will serve your ideal client, you can stand out as an expert in your field.

And as they become receptive to your helpful content, your target audience may be more likely to contact you, set up an appointment, and become a regular client.

I can’t promise this is going to happen overnight, but as traffic increases over time it does increase the likelihood of converting visitors to clients.

Reason #3: Pinterest can increase traffic to your therapy website exponentially.

When someone pins a post, it’s shared to their friends and followers. This means an entire network of individuals will be seeing your content.

The best part is that this can work exponentially in your favor to bring you loads of traffic.

For example, if you pin an image that links to your blog post and you only have 400 followers, it has the potential of being seen by those 400 individuals.

But if one of those 400 individuals REPINS your content and THEY have 4,000 followers, well you have the potential getting your pin (and clicks to your website) in front of 4,000 more people.

And on and on it goes.

So, more eyes means more traffic. More traffic means more prospective clients.

Reason #4: Your audience is looking for the inspiration and content that you can provide.

Since 66% of people on Pinterest are using the platform for that purpose, give them what they’re looking for.

You see, Pinterest is really a search engine… NOT a social media website.

Pinterest is a place where people go to find answers and it’s a great place to provide answers by pinning your blog posts there regularly.

Ensure your messaging is both inspirational and actionable, giving your future clients a roadmap to follow that ultimately leads directly to you.

Whether they’re numbered lists or how to’s, providing the right content to the right audience on the right platform could be a game changer for your private practice.

Reason #5: Pinterest can help with your SEO

One thing that search engines pay attention to is something called “social signals.”

Social signals do play a role in organic and local search engine optimization. Search engines want to show their users the most relevant and engaging content.

As people interact with your pins and traffic increases over time, it can cause a positive impact on your local search engine rankings.

So when potential, local clients search for services related to your practice, Google will be more likely to show them your website, as it sees that Pinterest is sending many other engaged users to your content.

And beyond local search, your pins can (and probably will) pop up from time to time in Google search results, eventually leading traffic back to your website.

Is Your Private Practice on Pinterest Yet?

Personally, Pinterest is my FAVORITE way to drive traffic to any website.

It currently accounts for more than 90% of all traffic to this here site… and all without having to pay for my content to be seen (like you have to do on Facebook).

If you’re ready to set up a Pinterest profile for your private practice and start driving some traffic, check out the post The Therapist’s Guide to Pinterest.

You don’t need a special algorithm to successfully marketing your private practice on Pinterest.

With a little effort and good content, you will draw your ideal client to you in no time.

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Getting Started with Google Analytics

Understanding your audience is critical to the success of your private practice. Web traffic stats give you a clear picture of who is visiting, where they’re coming from, how long they’re on your site, and so much more. And with Google Analytics, all of this information is free!

Getting Started With Google Analytics Pinterest. Understanding your audience is critical to the success of your private practice. Web traffic stats give you a clear picture of who is visiting, where they’re coming from, how long they’re on your site, and so much more. And with Google Analytics, all of this information is free!

Getting started with Google Analytics can be a bit daunting at first, but after a few simple clicks, and some basic knowledge of how to read reports, you’ll be ready to refine your content to reach your target audience – your future clients!

For example, is your traffic peaking at a specific time? Then that’s when you know to post new content!

Is it coming from a specific source, like Pinterest? Now you know where to focus your marketing efforts!

Here’s how you get started:

 

Step 1: Create a Google Account

This one is rather simple, especially if you already have a Google or Gmail account!

Just click on the Google Analytics Sign Up page and either register or login, if you already have an account.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 9.06.15 AM

Step 2: Sign up for Google Analytics

Once you’ve logged in to your Google account, you’ll see this screen. Click on “Sign Up” to start your Google Analytics account.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 9.07.34 AM

Step 3: Set up your website tracking

The following screen will prompt you to enter some information regarding your website. It gives you the option of entering information for a Website or a Mobile site.

VERY IMPORTANT – Choose “Website”! Then enter the information requested.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 9.11.24 AM

Step 4: Get your tracking code

Once you’ve gone through the aforementioned steps, Google Analytics will provide you with your own unique tracking code.

Once that code is entered into your WordPress site, ideally through a plugin, data will bounce back and forth between the two tools, providing you with all the information you need about your audience!

The tracking code page looks a little something like this:

gatrackingcode

Not Using WordPress?

Click on the website platform you’re using to view instructions on where you’ll need to place your Google Analytics tracking code:

Useful Reports:

Now that Google Analytics is up and running efficiently, you’re going to want to monitor your reports.

The ones I find most useful are:

  • Audience Overview (bird’s eye view of what your audience is doing)
  • Audience Demographics (characteristics of your audience including age, interests, gender, etc)
  • Acquisition Overview (where your audience is coming from)
  • Acquisition Social (what social media platforms your audience is coming from)
  • Behavior Overview (what your audience is doing while on your site).

Here is the Audience Overview Dashboard:

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 12.24.55 PM

Here, you can see how many new visitors there are vs returning visitors, the total number of people visiting the site in a given time period (May 29-June 4), and on average how long they were on the site.

The metrics you monitor can be changed in the drop down menu under “Overview”.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 12.28.24 PM

If you ever get stuck, Google Analytics has a built in tutor to walk you through reading reports in each section.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 12.30.55 PM

Conclusion

The more you know, the better you can serve your prospective patients.

Using Google Analytics on your private practice website is an easy way to learn all you can about your audience in real time, make necessary changes, and draw even more traffic to your business.

Join the Free Facebook Community

The Ultimate List of Online Directories for Therapists

Online directories are often the first place a therapist will go to get their services out into the world. They can be a great source for new clients coming into your private practice especially when starting out.

Online directories are often the first place a therapist will go to get their services out into the world. They can be a great source for new clients coming into your private practice especially when starting out. In this post you’ll find nearly 100 online therapist directories where you can list your services.

Even before she had a website, my wife had a Psychology Today profile. It was through this that she was able to get a couple of her very first counseling clients.

Once we launched her website, she linked to it from her online profile, and she had a tag team of online marketing that really let her personality and her services shine.

In this post you’ll find nearly 100 online therapist directories where you can list your services.

General Therapist Directories

  1. 1-800-Therapist
  2. Africanamericantherapists.com
  3. All About Counseling
  4. Alternative Therapists Directory
  5. American Therapy Association
  6. BetterHelp.com
  7. CatholicTherapists.com
  8. Christian Counselor Directory
  9. CounselChat
  10. Couples Therapist Directory
  11. EMDR International Association
  12. Ethnic Counselors
  13. The Family & Marriage Counseling Directory
  14. Find-a-Therapist.com
  15. Gay & Lesbian Medical Association (GLMA)
  16. GoodTherapy.org
  17. HelpPro Therapist Finder
  18. Hypnotic World
  19. International Institute for Trauma and Addiction Professionals
  20. The International Society for Neurofeedback and Research
  21. International Therapist Directory
  22. Integrative Medicine for Mental Health
  23. IVY
  24. Licensed Therapists
  25. Life Quality Improvement Center
  26. Marriage Counseling & Therapy Network
  27. MentalHelp.net
  28. My Therapist Match
  29. National Board of Certified Counselors
  30. National Directory of Family & Marriage Counseling
  31. NetworkTherapy.com
  32. Online Counselling Directory
  33. Online Therapy Institute’s Directory
  34. PsychDirectory
  35. Psychology.com
  36. Psychology Today
  37. Right Therapist
  38. Self Growth
  39. Talking Therapy
  40. Talkspace
  41. The Therapists Directory
  42. TherapistLocator.net
  43. TherapySquare
  44. TherapyTribe.com
  45. Theravive
  46. Wecounsel

Location Specific Therapist Directories

Asia:

  1. Psychology Matters Asia

Australia:

  1. Associated Relationship & Marriage Counselling Sydney
  2. Australia Counselling Directory

British Columbia:

  1. CounsellingBC.com

Great Britain:

  1. The British Psychological Society
  2. CounsellingBC.com

United States:

Alabama:

Alaska:

Arizona:

California:

Colorado:

Connecticut:

Delaware:

Georgia:

Hawaii:

Indiana:

Kansas:

Kentucky:

Massachusetts:

Michigan:

Minnesota:

New Hampshire:

New Jersey:

Oregon:

Pennsylvania:

Texas:

Washington:

Did I Miss Any?

Let me know in the comments below if there are any online directories for therapists that I missed and I’ll make sure to add them to the list!

30 Ways to Market A Private Practice for FREE

If you’re just getting your private practice off the ground, every penny counts. At this crucial time in your business, spending hundreds of dollars on advertising may just not feasible for you. Luckily, there are many ways for you to market a private practice for free.

In this blog post I’ll share with you 30 ways you can market your therapy practice without costing you a cent.

If you’re just getting your private practice off the ground, every penny counts. At this crucial time in your business, spending hundreds of dollars on advertising may just not feasible for you. Luckily, there are many ways for you to market a private practice for free.  In this blog post I’ll share with you 30 ways you can market your therapy practice without costing you a cent.

Whether you’re just starting out and trying to save money, or you just need an extra boost to your marketing efforts, you can use these strategies to get in front of more people and grow your private practice.

1. Create a website using a free/basic account with a builder like weebly.com

2. Build a Facebook page

3. Use Pinterest to share your blog posts

4. Ask Family and Friends to Share About Your Practice on Facebook

5. Send an email to family and friends letting them know you’re accepting clients

6. Share your business card with local churches, doctors offices, wellness centers

7. Add your therapy practice to local online business directories

8. Network with other therapists in your area

9. Put social sharing buttons on your blog posts

10. Guest post on someone else’s blog

11. Start an email list

12. Email your list regularly

13. Put your practice on Google Business/Google Maps

14. Sign up for a free 6 month trial of Psychology Today: Email me and my wife and I will send you a link.

15. Create landing pages for each of your specialties to boost SEO

16. Join a Facebook group where your ideal clients are and answer questions and add value

17. Start a blog (check out the benefits of blogging)

18. Create promotional images and flyers using a free design program like canva.com

19. Add more links within your website to other relevant content to keep people on your website longer

20. Make sure your website link is listed everywhere you are online (online directories, social profiles, LinkedIn, etc.)

21. Attend a free webinar or workshop for more marketing ideas

22. Create a short video for your website introducing yourself and your practice

23. Create a “Your First Visit” web page to let new clients know what to expect

24. Get a friend to take a new profile photo for you and use it consistently across all your online/social platforms

25. Set your business Facebook page as your workplace on your personal Facebook profile

26. Use IFTTT to automatically share your blog posts every time a new one is published

27. Set up a Google Plus business page

28. Create some pretty social images of inspiration quotes using Pablo

29. Brainstorm the titles of 10 blogs you could write (here’s how I do it)

30. Sign up for a free Buffer account and schedule 10 social media posts

I hope this list gets your brain waves rolling and inspires you to try some new ways to market your therapy practice. Let me know in the comments which one you’ll try first!

Check out my latest FREE training to learn the content you need in order to attract your ideal clients to your website, plus tips on driving more traffic. Just click the banner below to get started!

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How to Use Facebook to Market Your Private Practice

Last week I sent out an email to my audience asking one simple question: what would you like to know about using Facebook to market your practice?

Well, I was amazed at the response and the questions that came back were just SO good!

Many of you want to know if Facebook is even relevant for marketing your therapy practice.

Some folks were concerned over privacy issues and how to separate your personal Facebook account from a business account.

So many of you really wanted to know more about how to use Facebook ads to market your private practice.

I really needed an expert to answer all these great questions, so I reached out to Jennifer Spong Sneeden, from Thriving Therapy Practice, for some help.

Jennifer has seen SO much success in using Facebook to market her private practice that it’s actually become her number one source of new clients.

She’s since taught hundreds of other therapists to use Facebook effectively in their own practices.

To help you out, she decided to create the video below just for the CMTW audience, answering some of your most common questions about Facebook.

Now, Jennifer is taking this one step further…

Because she’s so confident that Facebook is one of the best ways to grow your own practice, she’s agreed to host a free, exclusive live training just for the readers of this here blog.

In this virtual training, she’s going to show you her simple 5-step system to build your Facebook following, engage your fans, and increase your income.

If Facebook seems like a waste of time because you’re not getting the results you want, this FREE training is for you. Just click the banner below to claim your spot:

Learn how to use Facebook to market your private practice

This Facebook training will take place, January 19, 2017 at two different times: 1PM and 8PM EST. Sign up now to make sure you get a spot.

We’ll see you there!

Does Your Therapy Website Really Need a Blog?

With all the talk out there about “content marketing” and blogging, it’s really important to know if starting a private practice blog is right for you and your website.

In this post we’ll talk about the benefits of blogging and determine if this marketing strategy is right for you and your therapy practice.

7 Benefits of Having a Blog on Your Therapy Website

1. Blogging Can Help Refine the Focus of Your Therapy Practice

When you write on a regular basis, you begin to understand what topics you’re passionate about.

This let’s you refine your message and philosophy in your private practice and business.

I believe it also helps you become a better communicator in your therapy sessions.

When I first began consulting, I felt pretty unsure of myself and my expertise.

Blogging has helped me learn SO much through the research I do and it has helped me decide where I stand on certain topics.

I’m now confident helping my clients with the many choices they need to make around online marketing a private practice.

2. An Active Blog Can Boost The Search Engine Page Rank of Your Therapy Website

Did you know that websites with a blog tend to have 434% more pages indexed by Google than websites without? (source)

Each time you add a blog to your website, you’re adding another page for search engines to crawl through.

Google is more likely to show your website in search results if it knows that it’s been updated more frequently than a website that hasn’t been updated in months.

3. A Blog Can Increase Your “Like, Know and Trust” Factor

Blogging by nature has a way of showcasing your personality, making you appear more “real” to potential clients.

Over time, readers can achieve a sense of knowing you.

And as they get to know you and your personal touch to what you teach, they’ll begin to trust you.

This survey shows that consumers consider blogs to be the 5th most trusted source of information, because it’s coming straight from the person writing them.

4. Blogging Can Help Prove Your Expertise to Your Ideal Therapy Clients

Blogging can make you appear as an expert in your field.

If your website is chock full of great information, it’s going to make you stand out next to a therapist without information.

It shows potential clients that you’re passionate about your work and that you have a lot to say on the subject matter you cover in your counseling office.

I know I’d rather hire an expert to counsel me than someone with the bare essentials on their website.

5. Blogging Can Increase Your Web Traffic

Time and again, I’ve seen this in action.

When my wife began to consistently post new blogs on her counseling website, we saw her traffic nearly double without doing anything else.

She wasn’t even using social media to promote the blog!

Blogging increases the amount of pages on your website, makes your site look fresh, and increases the amount of keywords found on your website… All things Google loves.

Related: 5 Tips to Increase Your Therapy Website Traffic By Choosing a Niche

6. Blogging Can Lead to More Clients in Your Private Practice

According to Hubspot, “82% of marketers who blog daily acquired a customer using their blog, as opposed to 57% of marketers who blog monthly — which, by itself, is still an impressive result.”

Blogging can attract clients. Nuff said.

7. Blogging is FREE

Free is my favorite!

The only cost of blogging is your time.

If you’re just starting out, blogging can be one of the best ways to market your new private practice.

Combine it with active social media promotion and it’s a completely free system for driving traffic to your website and attracting clients.

How To Determine if Blogging is Right For Marketing Your Private Practice

Blogging may still not make sense for your therapy practice even after seeing the list of benefits above.

Let me explain.

I’m not a business coach in any way and it’s up to you to determine what feels right…

But I can speak from the experience my wife had with her private practice and her counseling blog.

Before her practice saw a steady flow of clients, she obviously had a lot more time on her hands.

This meant she could focus on her marketing.

So, I encouraged her to start blogging on the regular to help her get more traffic to her website.

For a period of about 8 months she made blogging a regular part of her marketing routine.

And her web traffic saw a significant increase.

She finally hit a point in her business where it was easier to say “I don’t NEED to blog in order to get clients”. Most of her new clients come from referrals now.

So naturally, as her business train got moving and left the station, she blogged less and less.

I tell this story to help you think about where you’re at in your private practice?

Are you just starting out and looking to fill your calendar with clients? Or is business a little slower than you like?

Then blogging on a regular basis could be a great way to get more people to your website and potentially get more clients in your office.

But if you’re comfortable with how your therapy practice is going and you have a lot on your plate, blogging may not be necessary right now.

You also may not want the added stress of finding the time to sit down and write every week… not to mention the guilt you may feel when you don’t post a blog as often as you think you “should”.

So, think about that.

And if you’re ready to start blogging, pick a schedule (maybe start with 2 posts a month) and stick to it.

Now go get ‘em, Tiger.

Pin This Article for Later:

With all the talk out there about “content marketing” and blogging, it’s really important to know if starting a private practice blog is right for you and your website. In this post we’ll talk about the benefits of blogging and determine if this marketing strategy is right for you and your therapy practice.

 

If you want access to more tips, advanced tutorials, videos and cheat sheets, go ahead and join my VIP list, where you’ll get FREE access to a library of resources to help you create an awesome therapy website and market your practice online.

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CLICK FOR FREE ACCESS!

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5 Tips to Increase Your Therapy Website Traffic By Choosing a Niche

So you’ve launched your private practice website. You spent hours crafting the perfect description for each of your counseling services and even more hours getting each page just right. But you noticed you’re not getting the right kind of clients through your website – the ones you really enjoy working with. Why is that?

One reason why your private practice website may not be attracting the potential clients you hoped for is because your website (and possibly your therapy practice) lacks a niche; a specific type of person you focus on serving. In today’s post I'll tell you about my failed blogs, how I learned the importance of choosing a niche and how it can increase the RIGHT traffic coming to your therapy website

One reason why your private practice website may not be attracting the potential clients you hoped for is because your website (and possibly your therapy practice) lacks a niche; a specific type of person you focus on serving.

In today’s post I’ll tell you about my failed blogs, how I learned the importance of choosing a niche and how it can increase the RIGHT traffic coming to your therapy website.

My “Failed” Blogs

Once upon a time, I started my first blog.

I was getting ready to drive cross country, from New York to Montana, then do some misison work in India and Thailand.

I loved sharing my stories and photos from that amazing adventure, but really the only people interested in it were my family and a handful of friends from my church.

Judging by blog comments, only my mom was reading. Thanks Mom!

Granted, my goal was not online marketing at the time, but rather I wanted to journal my experiences, so I was fine with the low readership.

Fast-forward a couple years and I started a website and blog centered around travel photography. It was a continuation of sharing the stories and adventures of the many international trips me and my wife love to take.

I wanted to sell photography as a way to raise money for future trips so I attempted to do this through a brand-spankin’ new website and blog.

Yet again, this website only seemed to attract our loyal group of friends and family with one or two rogue people who seemed somewhat interested in what I was doing.

Here’s a snapshot of my traffic during an average month:

Choose a niche for your therapy practice

I had a few folks stay on the site longer than a minute, so I guess that’s a win!

Ok, so moving right along…

Using My Third Blog as a Training Ground

Photography is still a huge part of my creative outlet as well as the travel we do, however it became more and more clear to me that it wasn’t something I wanted to pursue more than just a hobby.

So, as I became a lost creative vagabond, I basically landed back on my old portfolio website blogging about whatever interested me at the time.

How to make wall art, photography, book reviews. All great stuff but it was pretty random.

However, this time around, things were starting to change.

I began to treat blogging less as a hobby and more as way to grow an audience, share ideas and market my services.

I started an email list, I became more consistent with posting content and then sharing it on social media networks.

You can see the comparison from Google Analytics below. In April of 2015 (the orange line), I posted one short blog. In May of 2015 (the blue line) I posted a blog every week and promoted those blogs. You can see the difference:

Comparing my website traffic in Google Analytics

While this was great to see that I was on the right track, it was still unclear who the heck this blog was for.

Who was I actually helping? Who was I speaking to? I was not connecting with anyone through my efforts.

When it Comes to Web Traffic, Choosing a Niche Makes All The Difference

I started this blog here in July of 2015 because I wanted to share my web design gifts by helping others.

After so many of my wife’s coworkers at her counseling practice asked me about website design, I realized I could finally start a blog with a very specific focus: helping therapists and counselors create their own websites and market themselves online.

Once I landed on that, ideas for blog posts kept flooding my mind.

I had a million things I could write about and I knew exactly who I was talking to and ideas about ways I could help them.

And within that first month, I had over 2500 pageviews, which was double the pageviews on my previous blog’s best month.

I also began to get emails from people thanking me for my content and letting me know how it has helped them. I can’t ask for anything better than that!

I also believe that the specific topics I discuss has helped me grow my Pinterest audience much quicker as well.

I’ve tried to make it very clear by the topics I discuss that if you’re a therapist looking to learn web design, you’re in the right place.

My wife does this in her counseling practice by focusing on establishing healthy relationships. All the blogs she’s posted and content she’s written falls under that umbrella.

And for the most part, they majority of work she does with her clients is centered around relationships, boundaries and breaking dysfunctional habits that hurt connection.

That’s what she loves so that’s the content she creates and that’s who ends up in her office.

5 Tips for Choosing Your Private Practice Niche

So what about you and your private practice website?

Have you made it clear who you help and what you help them achieve?

You may very well already be working with a specific population within your therapy practice, but have you found a way to effectively communicate that on your website?

Doing so can help you boost your web traffic, hook potential clients and help you clarify your marketing voice.

Because I always try to leave you with something practical, here are a few tips to help you clarify your own niche:

1. Over the course of a month, look at the types of clients you’ve been working with. Is there a particular type of client that you just keep attracting? Write down these types of clients, their struggles and how your services can help them and begin to use those words on your therapy website.

2. Thinking about the type of practice you want to have 5 years from now, are there any clients that excite or energize you? Do you love working with couples? Or women with postpartum depression? You can begin to write blogs geared toward helping the clients that you love.

3. Write out your elevator pitch and use it on your website. Something along the lines of “I help [insert population you work with here] achieve/get/establish [desired outcome here]”. Use this on your homepage and on your about page.

4. Write website copy with your ideal client in mind and seek to serve them and guide them. I’m confident doing this is what helps create connection with your website users. You want your potential ideal client to know that they are in the right place and seeking therapy with you is the answer to the problem they’re facing.

5. Ask friends, family and colleagues. Speaking to the people that know you best is a great way to find out if there are any areas where they’ve observed you thriving. They can see gifts in you that maybe you can’t see yourself and help you determine the type of people you are gifted in helping within your therapy practice.

Have you found your niche yet? I’d love to hear more about it in the comments! Post your elevator pitch in the comments below.

Therapy Website Must-Haves, Designing for Potential Clients & SEO Tips

A couple of weeks ago I had the honor of talking with Clay, for the onlinecounseling.com podcast. If you’re not familiar, onlinecounseling.com is an online directory for therapists, counselors, social workers, psychologists and psychiatrists that have taken their practices online and offer virtual counseling services.

While the podcast typically focuses on online counseling, it’s also an amazing resource to anyone with a private practice. Clay also has a Therapist Toolbox on his website that’s packed with resources to help you grow your practice and build your business.

The interview was not only a lot of fun, it’s totally info-packed! We covered a lot of topics and I know you’ll get a lot out of it.

We spent the most time talking about finding your voice within your therapy website and creating content that speaks to your ideal client. Because, let’s face it: web design means nothing if it doesn’t attract the right people to your therapy practice.

Here’s just some of what you’ll learn in the podcast episode:

  • An elaboration of my own journey into how I got started creating therapy websites and my blog
  • The foreign country where I met my wife (the Therapist)
  • What is WordPress and how popular is it?
  • Finding your voice and how to use your therapy website to speak to potential clients
  • Tips to help your SEO and attract the right clients
  • Some must-haves for any private practice website
  • Making it easier for potential clients to get to know you through your therapy website
  • Content marketing and why it’s important

So head on over to onlinecounseling.com to access the full episode (or click the image below). I encourage you to explore Clay’s website and check out his many resources as well as some of the past podcast episodes to hear from experts in the counseling community.

 

The Online Counseling Podcast  explores the world of online psychotherapy and those that practice tele-medicine.

 

Are you a therapist thinking about creating a website but have no idea where to begin?

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