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How the Copy on Your Website Converts Leads to Clients: And Why You Really Need a Niche

I hate to say it, but as clinicians, we can be a little slow on the entrepreneurial uptake. We’re often so focused on serving our clients well, that we struggle to come up for air and think about the professional side of our practices.

And, because we sometimes forget that we’re running a business as well as serving others, it’s not uncommon for those in the psychotherapy profession to neglect business-building activities.

I hate to say it, but as clinicians, we can be a little slow on the entrepreneurial uptake. We’re often so focused on serving our clients well, that we struggle to come up for air and think about the professional side of our practices. And, because we sometimes forget that we’re running a business as well as serving others, it’s not uncommon for those in the psychotherapy profession to neglect business-building activities.

For instance, the idea of incorporating or even relying on technology in our practices is still a bit scary and there is a definite tension when it comes to clinicians embracing modern ways of networking and marketing.

In fact, I literally get questions daily about how online marketing works and whether or not a fellow therapist actually needs a website.

As 2017 draws to an end and we approach 2018, the answer is an unwavering and astounding YES!

Yes, you need a website. But not only that, you need a well-designed website that is both visually appealing and speaks directly to your ideal client.

Now, I’m “technically” a millennial so my willingness to embrace technology may be a bit skewed, but I’m being really honest when I say that even my 90-year-old grandma has an iPhone.

This goes to show that no matter your ideal client population, they are online.

Your website is your greatest business asset.

It’s inexpensive to maintain and it works for you 24/7. Sure, there is an initial cost to set up a website properly, and whether you hire it out or create it yourself, there is a large commitment of either money or time up front.

But take that money you spend and divide it into an hourly wage, and you’ll see that your website is actually your most underpaid employee.

Your website is also your greatest gatekeeper.

When your content is written in a way that speaks directly to your ideal client, you will not only attract them to your practice but repel those that are not a good fit.

The same goes for posting your hours and fees online. Those who cannot fit into your schedule or afford your fees will move on. But, the calls that do come will be serious and motivated inquiries.

Perhaps the best thing about having a well-designed website, however, is the fact that it is a marketing machine.

I’m a big fan of in-person networking and believe it’s essential to growing and scaling any practice.

But, it’s just not possible to meet in person 24-hours a day. What’s more, a client in need whose anxiety has him up at 3 in the morning can’t go in and see his primary care doctor.

So, who better to turn to than good ol’ Google?

Having an attractive website allows you to still be available despite the time of day or circumstances. It also provides you with an internet home base which acts as the hub of your online marketing.

The Truth About Content and Online Marketing

By now, we are well aware that we must market our practices to see any kind of success.

There are just so many professionals in our field, that without a concentrated effort, we will never stand out from the crowd.

However, many of the traditional ways we are taught to promote ourselves: in-person networking, business events in the community, forming partnerships with doctors and psychiatrists, hosting open houses, etc. all demand so much effort that they leave little time for us to concentrate on what we do best – therapy.

The truth about internet marketing is that any AND everything that is posted online counts as content.

This includes the raging rant we posted five years ago after being pulled over for a broken taillight when there are “real” criminals out there. And, it also includes the picture from last week where we are shaking hands with the police chief after implementing a mental health system in the county jail.

Though hilarious (or mortifying – however you want to look at it), what’s difficult about marketing in 2017 and beyond is that nothing ever disappears from the internet.

If it’s been posted somewhere, whether immediately “deleted” or not, it is accessible by someone, somehow. This means that all of the content we have ever created contributes to our online reputation and our web presence.

The fortunate thing, though, is that content is cumulative. So, the more positive things you post about yourself personally and professionally, the better your reputation becomes.

This strategic curation of online content that highlights you and your practice in a positive way becomes what is known as your “brand.”

Positioning your brand’s message so it is easily accessible by those that most need your help is what is known as content marketing.

Content Marketing is an extremely powerful tool for attracting clients and building a practice with much less effort and overhead than ever before.

Utilizing blogs, videos, images, and website copy allows therapists to highlight themselves among all other clinicians in the area and position their practice as the one that is the best match for those needing services.

What’s more, recent surveys show that technology such as the internet and Smart Phones are not commodities.

Regardless of their socioeconomic status, clients are online.

Therefore, content marketing is one way to reach populations that might not ever find their way to therapy through traditional channels.

Lastly, content marketing is a fervent way for us to build practices we truly love and are excited about showing up to every day.

How Your Website Fits into A Content Marketing Strategy

Like I mentioned above, your website is the hub of your presence online.

It is where your brand lives and where all of your potential clients should be going to find out more about working with you.

The first impression, which is almost always visual, is what keeps these potential leads from immediately bouncing away from your site.

However, it is the web copy (read: content) that draws the reader in and converts them from a prospect to a paying client.

There are a few different ways a lead might land on your website.

They may find you directly by putting keyword phrases into a search engine, they may find your website listed on a directory, or they may stumble across your business or rack card.

In each of these cases, the prospect is what is considered a “cold” lead. They do not know you, and they have not received your name or contact information from anyone they trust.

Once they have found you online, the only thing cold leads have to go on when deciding whether or not you are a good fit for them is the copy on your website.

How you speak to potential clients has a profound effect on whether or not they pick up the phone to schedule with you. Talking directly to leads in a language that resonates will cause them to have an emotional reaction and believe that you truly understand what it is they are struggling with.

Ensuring that your website is filled to the brim with such tailored content is the quickest way to earn a prospect’s trust and encourage them to get in contact with you.

And it’s not much different for warm leads.

These are the people who come to your website through a referral. Whether they receive your name from a trusted doctor or loved one, in this day and age, the majority of people will still go to your website to learn more about you.

While warms leads are a bit more primed to schedule with you, they can still be turned off if they don’t believe that you are the right fit for them.

Talking in too general of a way is just not helpful. Without reaching leads at a core level, you will always leave readers of your website in a lukewarm state.

But, if you’re able to get to the core of the prospect’s struggles, and speak to them on each and every page of your site, you can elicit an emotional response and motivate them to pick up the phone.

So, what’s the key to speaking in a way that resonates with potential clients?

Choosing a niche.

What is Niche Marketing and Why Should Therapists Use It?

The idea of defining your niche is still a bit controversial in clinician circles.

One reason for this is there are some that think niching down is unethical as therapists who prefer a certain population are essentially denying services to some who may be in need.

The idea, however, is not to deny services, but to offer therapy at a higher skill level.

In fact, defining your ideal client allows you to hone your skills and become a specialist. So long as you are providing legitimate options and alternatives to those outside your niche, such as genuine referrals, you are not violating any ethical guidelines.

Another common hang-up about niching down is that some therapists believe it to be too restrictive to build a thriving practice.

It’s true, the second you decide to niche your practice, you are basically choosing to alienate a large segment of potential clients. By narrowing your focus to one slice of the population, you are effectively telling others that you do not serve them as well as you serve your chosen demographic.

This can be really scary, especially when clinicians are new to practice or do not have a full caseload.

But the reality is, defining your niche is the quickest way to fill a practice with clients you are excited to work with and that leave you feeling professionally fulfilled.

Incorporating niche marketing into your practice is the best way to write “tight” website copy.

Copy that is too loose or that has too many holes in it will not speak to your ideal clients. It gives them too many opportunities to turn their attention elsewhere.

However, web copy that is written with a niche in mind becomes sharp and provocative and resonates with readers at their core.

A Five-Step Niching Process

So now that you know the importance of your website and also how integral your web copy is to attracting your ideal client, it’s time to figure out how to go about defining your niche.

A lot of clinicians make the mistake of having a niche that is too wide.

Again, this probably goes back to the fear of repelling too many clients and operating from a scarcity mindset.

However, there are enough clients for every therapist to build a profitable practice, so there should be no fear about learning to attract a very narrow segment of the population.

A great tip is to imagine the act of defining your niche as building an upside-down pyramid.

The objective is to work from a wide scope and funnel the concept of your ideal client down until it becomes narrower and narrower.

At each stage, ask yourself questions about your ideal client like “what is at the core of their presenting problem” “what is underneath this complaint” and “what is really going on here” to help you really learn how to target them.

I always recommend going through this process five times so that you essentially narrow your niche down five levels.

An example of this is:

  1. Teenagers
  2. Teenagers whose grades have suddenly dropped
  3. Teenagers whose grades have suddenly dropped because they have developed test anxiety
  4. Teenagers whose grades have suddenly dropped and who have developed test anxiety because they are worried about getting into a good college
  5. Teenagers whose grades have suddenly dropped, who have developed test anxiety, and who are worried about getting into a good college because their older sibling graduated Suma Cum Laude from an Ivy League school

By the time you get to the fifth level, you have a completely clear idea of who you are marketing to and trying to attract to your practice.

Now, that does not mean that this is the only type of client you will see.

Some of your marketing will appeal to 20 or 30 somethings with anxiety or the parents of high-performing teens, but the core of your marketing message will resonate with a certain segment of the population which is the whole point.

This exercise isn’t always easy to do right off the bat and takes some practice, but once you get the hang of it, it can be fun to brainstorm different ideal client populations you’d like to serve.

If you need a little guidance when it comes to refining your niche, don’t worry, I’ve got you covered.

If you’d like to take your content marketing even further, by defining your ideal client, finding your ideal clients online and generating strategic, tailored website content, download your FREE 8-page workbook here >>> bit.ly/cliniciancontentworkbook

About Marissa Lawtonmarissa lawton portrait sm

Marissa Lawton is a licensed counselor, national board certified counselor, and member of the American Counseling Association. She is also an avid content marketer and lights up helping female clinicians build their private practices through strategic and tailored online marketing.

Marissa is the creator of The Clinician’s Guide to Content Marketing, a comprehensive system of masterclasses, concierge strategy calls, and boutique writing services that helps therapists identify their niche, find them online, and generate content that speaks directly to their ideal clients.

You can learn more about Marissa at risslawton.com

Stop Lying to Yourself (and Start Getting Your Full Fee as a Private Practice Therapist)!

A guest post written by Liz Miller, LPC, LMHC, NCC

You did it! You hung out your shingle and started your private practice counseling business. And at first, it’s great just to start seeing your new clients. A private practice! You’re doing this thing!

Except that your list of “reduced fee” clients is growing, or your full fee was never exactly that “full” a fee to begin with. Why? Because deep down you’re afraid that if you charge what you’re worth, the phone will stop ringing. Or worse, you don’t know what you’re worth as a therapist.

In this article I’ll share with you 3 questions to help you value your private practice and get paid your full fee.

In this article I’ll share with you 3 questions to help you value your private practice and get paid your full fee.

Fear of failure leads new private practice clinicians to devalue their services, creating a vicious cycle.

When you ask for lower fees, you get them. Then you struggle and the fear of failure increases.

As a clinician, you’re used to helping clients realize that we “teach people how to treat us.” But, the same is true of you as a business owner! The problem is that you don’t realize what therapy is worth to your clients, so you set low fees based on faulty assumptions and create self-fulfilling prophecies.

What if you challenged your own assumptions the way you ask clients to challenge theirs?

When you work with clients who don’t see their own worth and aren’t getting what they want out of life—in their jobs, in their marriages—you teach them to challenge their self-limiting or distorted beliefs and assumptions, don’t you?

What if you did the same thing for yourself in your business?

You have razor sharp CBT skills as a therapist. Use them!

What are the self-limiting—and business-limiting—beliefs that cause you to undervalue your work?

First, brainstorm all the reasons you tell yourself you can’t raise your rates or ask your clients to pay them.

If I raise my rates or require full fees:

  • Clients won’t be able to afford therapy.
  • Other therapists will believe I’m greedy or only profit-driven.
  • I’ll be violating my own desire to help people.
  • The phone will stop ringing, clients won’t come, and my business will fail.

Next, ask yourself some tried-and-true CBT questions as if your own therapist was asking them, and get brutally honest with yourself as you answer:

 

Am I examining all the evidence, or only what reinforces my belief?

While some clients might struggle to pay the fee I need to create a successful practice, it’s also true that many self-pay therapists have thriving businesses, so there is evidence that many clients can pay full fee.

 

Could my belief be an exaggeration of what’s true?

It’s true that a few individuals could look down on me for creating an abundant lifestyle through my full-fee private practice, but many more will understand that my successful business will allow me to give generously within my community.

 

Would others have different perspectives on this situation? What are they?

Many business owners in other fields—from law and architecture to plumbing and home building—understand that a successful business allows them to extend pro bono services to more people, not fewer. And, a successful business helps them employ others, too.

 

Is this thought black and white, or is it more complicated?

If others have created successful private pay practices, could my reluctance to charge well for my services be about more than a simple marketing analysis? For example, if I’m assuming no one in my smaller community will pay my full fee, and I find that other private pay therapists in small communities are charging more than I am, what are they doing that makes it work for some, but not other therapists?

 

Did someone else impress me with this belief, and if so, are there others I respect who would challenge it?

Where did I get my own money stories, anyway? Are my doubts and fears really my own, or have I willingly adopted someone else’s narrative?

 

Finally, get crystal clear on what you are really providing for your clients.

 

When you’re talking to a prospective client, and the lump in your throat is threatening your ability to state your full fee with confidence, remember:

You are NOT charging your full fee for one hour of psychotherapy. (Please repeat that!)

You are giving the human being on the other end of the line the skills and self-knowledge to:

  • Recover from the addiction that’s been ravaging their life for years so that they can restore their family and live to see their children get married.
  • Restore a loving, life-giving, fruitful bond with their spouse, which is empirically proven to increase longevity, health, well-being, and even financial security for themselves and their children.
  • Exchange anxiety or depression for a confident and joyful life, with all the implications that holds for their careers, families, and ability to serve their communities.

You are providing the opportunity for nothing less than a changed, restored life. This is what your full fee covers.

Are these outcomes worth the price of a semester of college, a weeklong trip to Disneyworld, or selling something on Craigslist while cutting their cable service for a few months?

Are these outcomes worth it to your reduced fee clients who are able to access your services because your thriving full-fee practice supports them? What about all the other outcomes that result from your philanthropic giving as a successful entrepreneur?

 

Take these 3 steps to change your perspective and start earning your full fee:

  1. Put on your CFO hat and get serious about understanding your finances. There are lots of resources available to help you understand what your gross income—and fee—needs to be to support the life you want, based on the expenses and needs of your business.
  2. Once you know the fee you need to charge, get ruthless about focusing on the evidence that supports your goals, not just your fears. Interview other therapists, get peer support in an online forum, and find out what successful full-fee therapists do to create a thriving practice.
  3. Finally, practice stating your full fee with confidence, reviewing first what your fee really provides both you and your family, and your clients.

Remember:

It’s as scary to face a struggling practice every day as it is to take a deep breath and state your full fee with confidence.

If you’re going to be out of your comfort zone whichever way you go, why not go for it? You might just get the practice of your dreams!

 

About Liz Miller

Liz Miller, LPC, LMHC, NCC is a private practice therapist in Moscow, Idaho, who is passionate about helping committed couples repair painful marriages, and helping individuals heal from trauma and create courage, meaning, and freedom in their lives. When she’s not working, she can be found walking her dog, playing guitar, or camped next to a river.  She is happiest outdoors in places where she can see the Milky Way.

Visit Liz at lizmillercounseling.com

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How To Write Amazing Blog Post Titles That People Actually Click

The titles of your blog posts are detrimental to the success of your content marketing. In a sea of Google search results and social media, the title of your post can mean the difference between a reader clicking for more or just brushing you aside.

In this post we’ll talk about 5 ways you can write catchy blog post titles that people can’t help but click on.

The titles of your blog posts are detrimental to the success of your content marketing. In a sea of Google search results and social media, the title of your post can mean the difference between a reader clicking for more or just brushing you aside. In this post we’ll talk about 5 ways you can write catchy blog post titles that people can’t help but click on.

Why Blog Titles Are So Important to Successful Content Marketing

Your blog headline is the first impression a reader will have with your content.

It can be their reason for clicking or their reason for brushing your post aside.

How sad would it be to slave over a blog post for hours, getting the content just write and then slapping a title on it that doesn’t draw people to the value they’ll find within the content?

We live in fast-paced times where the amount of information we see each day is astounding.

People are flying through their Facebook feed while waiting in checkout lines or scrolling through Pinterest while watching TV.

It’s become increasingly harder to make your content stand out and reach your ideal audience in this noisy sea of information.

But a catchy headline could cause someone to pause, pique their interest and make them hungry for more of the content they’ll find in your blog post.

It’s also one of the most important factors for your search engine optimization (SEO).

Combine SEO with a catchy, intriguing headline and it’s content marketing gold!

Let’s get into some tips for writing blog headlines that get clicked, shall we?

1: Keep your Blog Post Titles Short and Unique

55 characters is your target for the length of your blog post titles.

This is amount of characters that Google will show users in their search results. Anything longer will get cut off.

Shorter headlines also tend to get more clicks because they’re easier for readers to digest and know exactly what they’ll get when they click.

Get creative here. Don’t just write generic titles.

Include a keyword but also put some emotion into it that will make your title stand out from the rest of posts flying through the internet.

2: Focus On Keywords

Powerful headlines always focus on a keyword.

This is how people may find your blog post and let’s search engines know what your blog post is about.

Decide on what words your audience may type into Google to find your blog post and work that into the title.

3: Get Emotional

A catchy blog post title will have a healthy dose of emotion that will grab the reader’s attention and lead them to click for more.

You can use power words to not only make your post titles unique, but also give a sense of urgency, curiosity and emotion.

You want to stay away from common words like best, awesome, or great.

Go for the jugular here and get creative!

Use words like:

  • Ultimate
  • Greatest
  • Fascinating
  • The Truth About…

For example, a generic headline for blog post may go something like this:

“How to Set Boundaries in Marriage”

It’s not bad, but unless I’m really interested in that topic, it doesn’t really intrigue me much.

But what about:

“The TRUTH About Setting Boundaries in Marriage”

You see the difference? The second title creates a bit of intrigue and makes me feel like everything I’ve heard up to this point about boundaries in marriage was incorrect.

I just gotta click!!

Here’s a great list of 317 power words you can start using today.

4: Use Numbers

There’s something about numbers that increase engagement with blog post titles.

When you say “10 Ways to Set Boundaries in Marriage” as opposed to “How to Set Boundaries in Marriage” it conveys the value of the post and exactly what the reader will gain from checking out your content.

I enjoy creating these types of blog posts myself because they provide a clear outline for the content instead of a giant blank slate.

The same mentality gets passed along to readers, because they can more easily wrap their head around a list of short tips rather than one long “how to” post.

When it makes sense, try and include numbers in your headlines to drive engagement.

5: Write and Re-Write To Get Your Blog Post Titles Right

I had fun with the word-play on that subtitle, not gonna lie

Writing effective and engaging blog post titles takes a lot of practice.

Rarely will you ever use the first title you came up with.

I like to have a working title for my blog post to give me some direction for what I’m going to write.

But as the content unfolds, it may make sense to re-write the title.

Finally, once the blog post is complete, I’ll spend time focusing solely on optimizing my title.

One of my favorite tools to help me do this is CoSchedule’s Headline Analyzer.

You can put your headline into the form and CoSchedule will analyze it, score it and give you tips to improve it.

Here’s the analysis for a working title I had for this blog post:

blog post headline analyzer

You can see I’ve got some work to do get the right balance of words and structure for my title.

It will also give you some other scores to help you improve your headline, such as analyzing the length:

blog post headline analyzer length

Conclusion

Writing blog post headlines that stand out and get clicks takes time and practice.

It’s a skill, like blogging, that you’ll grow in over time.

Take note of the types of headlines you see in Google and social media and think about why they stood out to you.

Using the tips and resources above, spend time trying to recreate that feeling of urgency or curiosity you felt when you read those headlines.

Keep at it and, over time, I have no doubt you’ll see an increase in traffic to your blog posts.

Want more blogging tips? I've created a FREE checklist, 11 Things You Should Do To Every Blog Post Before You Hit Publish.

Inside, you'll get 11 simple things you can do to optimize each blog post. You can print it out and refer to whenever you write your next amazing piece of content.

I've created a free checklist for you to reference when writing your next blog post
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How to Increase Traffic Your Private Practice Website (Join the Free Challenge)

Getting people to show up to their private practice website is one of the greatest frustrations I hear from therapists.

I mean, why put all this effort into building your website if no one’s even going to visit it?

And how are you supposed to attract new clients if they can’t even find you online?

I’m with you.

I’m all for making sure you’re not spinning your wheels and wasting your time and resources trying to create a website that doesn’t bring you more traffic – and ultimately – clients.

So, how DO you increase your traffic and attract more potential clients to your website?

That’s the million dollar question, isn’t it?

Well, I’ve been there myself.

I launched Create My Therapist Website as a blog back in July of 2015 and since then I’ve learned all about what works and what doesn’t work when it comes to driving traffic to a website.

And after trying so many strategies – from pulling my hair out over SEO to trying to understand Facebook ads – I’ve landed on a simple system that keeps my blog on track and continuously brings me new traffic (mostly on autopilot).

The best part is, this traffic-driving strategy is FREE and it can work for anyone in any niche.

So, to help you get more traffic to your private practice website, I’ve developed a 10-day Kickstart Your Blog Traffic Challenge.

For 10 days, I’ll deliver one daily lesson to your inbox that will share with you simple ways you can increase traffic to your blog.

Each day will build on the day before it and by the end of it, you’ll have a system and a process you can follow to grow your traffic month after month.

I’ll also be bringing you some live video trainings along the way to answer your questions and go deeper into my favorite traffic-building tips.

Click here to enroll in the Kickstart Your Blog Traffic Challenge >>

Now, this isn’t just a bunch of random blog tips and tactics…

I’ll literally be sharing the same strategy I used that led to a 15x increase in traffic to my own website… in just 6 months.

It’s the same strategy I still use today to bring in tons of traffic to my website without SEO and paid advertising.

And I can’t wait to share it all with you inside this challenge

Because what I’ve learned is that it’s not rocket science, so anyone can follow this system to see an uptick in their own website traffic.

Ready to explode your traffic, grow your audience and attract more of your ideal clients? Join the free 10-day Kickstart Your Blog Traffic Challenge by clicking the banner below:

Click here to join the free challenge

Lesson #1 will arrive in your inbox today!

SaveSave

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Why Your Private Practice NEEDS To Be On Pinterest

Pinterest isn’t just for recipes, workout plans, and dream weddings. It’s actually a great way to drive traffic to your private practice’s website.

Did you know that Pinterest is the second largest driver of traffic, second only to Facebook?

So, if you’ve been weary about trying a new social media platform, below are 5 reasons why you need to be using Pinterest to your advantage.

Pinterest isn’t just for recipes, workout plans, and dream weddings. It’s actually a great way to drive traffic to your private practice’s website.

Reason #1: Pinterest has over 150 million users (and growing) who are providing details about their psychographics.

Whether they’re looking for inspirational quotes or have a board dedicated completely to self-care tips, your ideal clients are identifying themselves daily.

Using attractive graphics and optimizing your captions with keywords specific to your niche will draw your future clients directly to your site.

Your potential clients are using Pinterest already, so use it as an opportunity to attract them with content relevant to your private practice and expertise.

Reason #2: Your clients are open and receptive to your message.

In fact, they’re looking for it.

By being consistent with the design of your pin images and consistently providing content that will serve your ideal client, you can stand out as an expert in your field.

And as they become receptive to your helpful content, your target audience may be more likely to contact you, set up an appointment, and become a regular client.

I can’t promise this is going to happen overnight, but as traffic increases over time it does increase the likelihood of converting visitors to clients.

Reason #3: Pinterest can increase traffic to your therapy website exponentially.

When someone pins a post, it’s shared to their friends and followers. This means an entire network of individuals will be seeing your content.

The best part is that this can work exponentially in your favor to bring you loads of traffic.

For example, if you pin an image that links to your blog post and you only have 400 followers, it has the potential of being seen by those 400 individuals.

But if one of those 400 individuals REPINS your content and THEY have 4,000 followers, well you have the potential getting your pin (and clicks to your website) in front of 4,000 more people.

And on and on it goes.

So, more eyes means more traffic. More traffic means more prospective clients.

Reason #4: Your audience is looking for the inspiration and content that you can provide.

Since 66% of people on Pinterest are using the platform for that purpose, give them what they’re looking for.

You see, Pinterest is really a search engine… NOT a social media website.

Pinterest is a place where people go to find answers and it’s a great place to provide answers by pinning your blog posts there regularly.

Ensure your messaging is both inspirational and actionable, giving your future clients a roadmap to follow that ultimately leads directly to you.

Whether they’re numbered lists or how to’s, providing the right content to the right audience on the right platform could be a game changer for your private practice.

Reason #5: Pinterest can help with your SEO

One thing that search engines pay attention to is something called “social signals.”

Social signals do play a role in organic and local search engine optimization. Search engines want to show their users the most relevant and engaging content.

As people interact with your pins and traffic increases over time, it can cause a positive impact on your local search engine rankings.

So when potential, local clients search for services related to your practice, Google will be more likely to show them your website, as it sees that Pinterest is sending many other engaged users to your content.

And beyond local search, your pins can (and probably will) pop up from time to time in Google search results, eventually leading traffic back to your website.

Is Your Private Practice on Pinterest Yet? If not, read on…

Personally, Pinterest is my FAVORITE way to drive traffic to any website.

It currently accounts for more than 90% of all traffic to this here site… and all without having to pay for my content to be seen (like you have to do on Facebook).

In fact, using Pinterest led to a 15x increase in traffic to my own website… in just 6 months.

It required a little bit of strategy (but ANYONE can do it)

I’d like to share this Pinterest strategy with you inside this challenge

Because what I’ve learned is that it’s not rocket science, so anyone can follow this system to see an uptick in their own website traffic.

Ready to use Pinterest to explode your traffic, grow your audience and attract more of your ideal clients? Join the free 10-day Kickstart Your Blog Traffic Challenge by clicking the banner below:

Click here to join the free challenge

 

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Getting Started with Google Analytics

Understanding your audience is critical to the success of your private practice. Web traffic stats give you a clear picture of who is visiting, where they’re coming from, how long they’re on your site, and so much more. And with Google Analytics, all of this information is free!

Getting Started With Google Analytics Pinterest. Understanding your audience is critical to the success of your private practice. Web traffic stats give you a clear picture of who is visiting, where they’re coming from, how long they’re on your site, and so much more. And with Google Analytics, all of this information is free!

Getting started with Google Analytics can be a bit daunting at first, but after a few simple clicks, and some basic knowledge of how to read reports, you’ll be ready to refine your content to reach your target audience – your future clients!

For example, is your traffic peaking at a specific time? Then that’s when you know to post new content!

Is it coming from a specific source, like Pinterest? Now you know where to focus your marketing efforts!

Here’s how you get started:

 

Step 1: Create a Google Account

This one is rather simple, especially if you already have a Google or Gmail account!

Just click on the Google Analytics Sign Up page and either register or login, if you already have an account.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 9.06.15 AM

Step 2: Sign up for Google Analytics

Once you’ve logged in to your Google account, you’ll see this screen. Click on “Sign Up” to start your Google Analytics account.

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Step 3: Set up your website tracking

The following screen will prompt you to enter some information regarding your website. It gives you the option of entering information for a Website or a Mobile site.

VERY IMPORTANT – Choose “Website”! Then enter the information requested.

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Step 4: Get your tracking code

Once you’ve gone through the aforementioned steps, Google Analytics will provide you with your own unique tracking code.

Once that code is entered into your WordPress site, ideally through a plugin, data will bounce back and forth between the two tools, providing you with all the information you need about your audience!

The tracking code page looks a little something like this:

gatrackingcode

Not Using WordPress?

Click on the website platform you’re using to view instructions on where you’ll need to place your Google Analytics tracking code:

Useful Reports:

Now that Google Analytics is up and running efficiently, you’re going to want to monitor your reports.

The ones I find most useful are:

  • Audience Overview (bird’s eye view of what your audience is doing)
  • Audience Demographics (characteristics of your audience including age, interests, gender, etc)
  • Acquisition Overview (where your audience is coming from)
  • Acquisition Social (what social media platforms your audience is coming from)
  • Behavior Overview (what your audience is doing while on your site).

Here is the Audience Overview Dashboard:

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Here, you can see how many new visitors there are vs returning visitors, the total number of people visiting the site in a given time period (May 29-June 4), and on average how long they were on the site.

The metrics you monitor can be changed in the drop down menu under “Overview”.

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If you ever get stuck, Google Analytics has a built in tutor to walk you through reading reports in each section.

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Conclusion

The more you know, the better you can serve your prospective patients.

Using Google Analytics on your private practice website is an easy way to learn all you can about your audience in real time, make necessary changes, and draw even more traffic to your business.

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The Ultimate List of Online Directories for Therapists

Online directories are often the first place a therapist will go to get their services out into the world. They can be a great source for new clients coming into your private practice especially when starting out.

Online directories are often the first place a therapist will go to get their services out into the world. They can be a great source for new clients coming into your private practice especially when starting out. In this post you’ll find nearly 100 online therapist directories where you can list your services.

Even before she had a website, my wife had a Psychology Today profile. It was through this that she was able to get a couple of her very first counseling clients.

Once we launched her website, she linked to it from her online profile, and she had a tag team of online marketing that really let her personality and her services shine.

In this post you’ll find nearly 100 online therapist directories where you can list your services.

General Therapist Directories

  1. 1-800-Therapist
  2. Africanamericantherapists.com
  3. All About Counseling
  4. Alternative Therapists Directory
  5. American Therapy Association
  6. BetterHelp.com
  7. CatholicTherapists.com
  8. Christian Counselor Directory
  9. CounselChat
  10. Couples Therapist Directory
  11. EMDR International Association
  12. Ethnic Counselors
  13. The Family & Marriage Counseling Directory
  14. Find-a-Therapist.com
  15. Gay & Lesbian Medical Association (GLMA)
  16. GoodTherapy.org
  17. HelpPro Therapist Finder
  18. Hypnotic World
  19. International Institute for Trauma and Addiction Professionals
  20. The International Society for Neurofeedback and Research
  21. International Therapist Directory
  22. Integrative Medicine for Mental Health
  23. IVY
  24. Licensed Therapists
  25. Life Quality Improvement Center
  26. Marriage Counseling & Therapy Network
  27. MentalHelp.net
  28. My Therapist Match
  29. National Board of Certified Counselors
  30. National Directory of Family & Marriage Counseling
  31. NetworkTherapy.com
  32. Online Counselling Directory
  33. Online Therapy Institute’s Directory
  34. PsychDirectory
  35. Psychology.com
  36. Psychology Today
  37. Right Therapist
  38. Self Growth
  39. Talking Therapy
  40. Talkspace
  41. The Therapists Directory
  42. TherapistLocator.net
  43. TherapySquare
  44. TherapyTribe.com
  45. Theravive
  46. Wecounsel

Location Specific Therapist Directories

Asia:

  1. Psychology Matters Asia

Australia:

  1. Associated Relationship & Marriage Counselling Sydney
  2. Australia Counselling Directory

British Columbia:

  1. CounsellingBC.com

Great Britain:

  1. The British Psychological Society
  2. CounsellingBC.com

United States:

Alabama:

Alaska:

Arizona:

California:

Colorado:

Connecticut:

Delaware:

Georgia:

Hawaii:

Indiana:

Kansas:

Kentucky:

Massachusetts:

Michigan:

Minnesota:

New Hampshire:

New Jersey:

Oregon:

Pennsylvania:

Texas:

Washington:

Did I Miss Any?

Let me know in the comments below if there are any online directories for therapists that I missed and I’ll make sure to add them to the list!

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30 Ways to Market A Private Practice for FREE

If you’re just getting your private practice off the ground, every penny counts. At this crucial time in your business, spending hundreds of dollars on advertising may just not feasible for you. Luckily, there are many ways for you to market a private practice for free.

In this blog post I’ll share with you 30 ways you can market your therapy practice without costing you a cent.

If you’re just getting your private practice off the ground, every penny counts. At this crucial time in your business, spending hundreds of dollars on advertising may just not feasible for you. Luckily, there are many ways for you to market a private practice for free.  In this blog post I’ll share with you 30 ways you can market your therapy practice without costing you a cent.

Whether you’re just starting out and trying to save money, or you just need an extra boost to your marketing efforts, you can use these strategies to get in front of more people and grow your private practice.

1. Create a website using a free/basic account with a builder like weebly.com

2. Build a Facebook page

3. Use Pinterest to share your blog posts

4. Ask Family and Friends to Share About Your Practice on Facebook

5. Send an email to family and friends letting them know you’re accepting clients

6. Share your business card with local churches, doctors offices, wellness centers

7. Add your therapy practice to local online business directories

8. Network with other therapists in your area

9. Put social sharing buttons on your blog posts

10. Guest post on someone else’s blog

11. Start an email list

12. Email your list regularly

13. Put your practice on Google Business/Google Maps

14. Sign up for a free 6 month trial of Psychology Today: Email me and my wife and I will send you a link.

15. Create landing pages for each of your specialties to boost SEO

16. Join a Facebook group where your ideal clients are and answer questions and add value

17. Start a blog (check out the benefits of blogging)

18. Create promotional images and flyers using a free design program like canva.com

19. Add more links within your website to other relevant content to keep people on your website longer

20. Make sure your website link is listed everywhere you are online (online directories, social profiles, LinkedIn, etc.)

21. Attend a free webinar or workshop for more marketing ideas

22. Create a short video for your website introducing yourself and your practice

23. Create a “Your First Visit” web page to let new clients know what to expect

24. Get a friend to take a new profile photo for you and use it consistently across all your online/social platforms

25. Set your business Facebook page as your workplace on your personal Facebook profile

26. Use IFTTT to automatically share your blog posts every time a new one is published

27. Set up a Google Plus business page

28. Create some pretty social images of inspiration quotes using Pablo

29. Brainstorm the titles of 10 blogs you could write (here’s how I do it)

30. Sign up for a free Buffer account and schedule 10 social media posts

I hope this list gets your brain waves rolling and inspires you to try some new ways to market your therapy practice. Let me know in the comments which one you’ll try first!

Check out my latest FREE training to learn the content you need in order to attract your ideal clients to your website, plus tips on driving more traffic. Just click the banner below to get started!

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How to Use Facebook to Market Your Private Practice

Last week I sent out an email to my audience asking one simple question: what would you like to know about using Facebook to market your practice?

Well, I was amazed at the response and the questions that came back were just SO good!

Many of you want to know if Facebook is even relevant for marketing your therapy practice.

Some folks were concerned over privacy issues and how to separate your personal Facebook account from a business account.

So many of you really wanted to know more about how to use Facebook ads to market your private practice.

I really needed an expert to answer all these great questions, so I reached out to Jennifer Spong Sneeden, from Thriving Therapy Practice, for some help.

Jennifer has seen SO much success in using Facebook to market her private practice that it’s actually become her number one source of new clients.

She’s since taught hundreds of other therapists to use Facebook effectively in their own practices.

To help you out, she decided to create the video below just for the CMTW audience, answering some of your most common questions about Facebook.

Now, Jennifer is taking this one step further…

Because she’s so confident that Facebook is one of the best ways to grow your own practice, she’s agreed to host a free, exclusive live training just for the readers of this here blog.

In this virtual training, she’s going to show you her simple 5-step system to build your Facebook following, engage your fans, and increase your income.

If Facebook seems like a waste of time because you’re not getting the results you want, this FREE training is for you. Just click the banner below to claim your spot:

Learn how to use Facebook to market your private practice

This Facebook training will take place, January 19, 2017 at two different times: 1PM and 8PM EST. Sign up now to make sure you get a spot.

We’ll see you there!

Does Your Therapy Website Really Need a Blog?

With all the talk out there about “content marketing” and blogging, it’s really important to know if starting a private practice blog is right for you and your website.

In this post we’ll talk about the benefits of blogging and determine if this marketing strategy is right for you and your therapy practice.

7 Benefits of Having a Blog on Your Therapy Website

1. Blogging Can Help Refine the Focus of Your Therapy Practice

When you write on a regular basis, you begin to understand what topics you’re passionate about.

This let’s you refine your message and philosophy in your private practice and business.

I believe it also helps you become a better communicator in your therapy sessions.

When I first began consulting, I felt pretty unsure of myself and my expertise.

Blogging has helped me learn SO much through the research I do and it has helped me decide where I stand on certain topics.

I’m now confident helping my clients with the many choices they need to make around online marketing a private practice.

2. An Active Blog Can Boost The Search Engine Page Rank of Your Therapy Website

Did you know that websites with a blog tend to have 434% more pages indexed by Google than websites without? (source)

Each time you add a blog to your website, you’re adding another page for search engines to crawl through.

Google is more likely to show your website in search results if it knows that it’s been updated more frequently than a website that hasn’t been updated in months.

3. A Blog Can Increase Your “Like, Know and Trust” Factor

Blogging by nature has a way of showcasing your personality, making you appear more “real” to potential clients.

Over time, readers can achieve a sense of knowing you.

And as they get to know you and your personal touch to what you teach, they’ll begin to trust you.

This survey shows that consumers consider blogs to be the 5th most trusted source of information, because it’s coming straight from the person writing them.

4. Blogging Can Help Prove Your Expertise to Your Ideal Therapy Clients

Blogging can make you appear as an expert in your field.

If your website is chock full of great information, it’s going to make you stand out next to a therapist without information.

It shows potential clients that you’re passionate about your work and that you have a lot to say on the subject matter you cover in your counseling office.

I know I’d rather hire an expert to counsel me than someone with the bare essentials on their website.

5. Blogging Can Increase Your Web Traffic

Time and again, I’ve seen this in action.

When my wife began to consistently post new blogs on her counseling website, we saw her traffic nearly double without doing anything else.

She wasn’t even using social media to promote the blog!

Blogging increases the amount of pages on your website, makes your site look fresh, and increases the amount of keywords found on your website… All things Google loves.

Related: 5 Tips to Increase Your Therapy Website Traffic By Choosing a Niche

6. Blogging Can Lead to More Clients in Your Private Practice

According to Hubspot, “82% of marketers who blog daily acquired a customer using their blog, as opposed to 57% of marketers who blog monthly — which, by itself, is still an impressive result.”

Blogging can attract clients. Nuff said.

7. Blogging is FREE

Free is my favorite!

The only cost of blogging is your time.

If you’re just starting out, blogging can be one of the best ways to market your new private practice.

Combine it with active social media promotion and it’s a completely free system for driving traffic to your website and attracting clients.

How To Determine if Blogging is Right For Marketing Your Private Practice

Blogging may still not make sense for your therapy practice even after seeing the list of benefits above.

Let me explain.

I’m not a business coach in any way and it’s up to you to determine what feels right…

But I can speak from the experience my wife had with her private practice and her counseling blog.

Before her practice saw a steady flow of clients, she obviously had a lot more time on her hands.

This meant she could focus on her marketing.

So, I encouraged her to start blogging on the regular to help her get more traffic to her website.

For a period of about 8 months she made blogging a regular part of her marketing routine.

And her web traffic saw a significant increase.

She finally hit a point in her business where it was easier to say “I don’t NEED to blog in order to get clients”. Most of her new clients come from referrals now.

So naturally, as her business train got moving and left the station, she blogged less and less.

I tell this story to help you think about where you’re at in your private practice?

Are you just starting out and looking to fill your calendar with clients? Or is business a little slower than you like?

Then blogging on a regular basis could be a great way to get more people to your website and potentially get more clients in your office.

But if you’re comfortable with how your therapy practice is going and you have a lot on your plate, blogging may not be necessary right now.

You also may not want the added stress of finding the time to sit down and write every week… not to mention the guilt you may feel when you don’t post a blog as often as you think you “should”.

So, think about that.

And if you’re ready to start blogging, pick a schedule (maybe start with 2 posts a month) and stick to it.

Now go get ‘em, Tiger.

Pin This Article for Later:

With all the talk out there about “content marketing” and blogging, it’s really important to know if starting a private practice blog is right for you and your website. In this post we’ll talk about the benefits of blogging and determine if this marketing strategy is right for you and your therapy practice.

 

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